Called to Heal a Broken World

Friday, August 9 & Saturday, August 10, 2019
“Called to Heal a Broken World”

The Stevenson School for Ministry in collaboration with and sponsored by the Diocese of Central PA Social Justice Commission

Location:  St. Cyril Center Danville, PA

Cost:
Weekend registration cost: $150.00.
Day attendee registration cost:  $50.00.

This learning weekend features Keynote Speaker, the Rev. Becca Stevens of Thistle Farms and begins at 11 a.m. Friday, August 9 to and will end at 3:00 p.m. on Saturday, August 10. For questions, contact The Very Rev. Robyn Szoke (717) 236-5959 x1112 or rszoke@diocesecpa.org. Scholarships are available.

The Social Justice Weekend is designed for:

  • Social Justice Committee Members
  • Outreach Committees
  • Ecumenical friends and partners
  • All SSFM students and clergy continuing education
  • All interested in joining the Jesus Movement
  • Anyone seeking more intensive learning experience

The Rev. Becca Stevens is author, speaker, Episcopal priest, justice entrepreneur, and founder and president of Thistle Farms (Nashville, TN), a community of women survivors of prostitution, trafficking, and addiction. Becca has been featured in The New York Times, on ABC World News and NPR, and was recently named a 2016 CNN Hero and a White House “Champion of Change.” She was featured in the PBS documentary A Path Appears, named Humanitarian of the Year by the Small Business Council of America, and inducted into the Tennessee Women’s Hall of Fame. Stevens attended the University of the South and Vanderbilt Divinity School. We will be engaging attendees in Walking in The Way of Love and answering the question, “How are we called to Go?” in regards to the Jesus Movement. We plan to create a space for social justice advocates, students, organizers, community members and leaders to unite for the advancement of justice. And lastly, we will demonstrate possibilities for creating, engaging, and encouraging community collaborations.

Workshop options include tools for creative experimentation with outreach in your local community which speak to Presiding Bishop Michael Curry’s call for us to become a branch of the Jesus Movement.

Sign-up today. Only 65 registration slots available. To register, visit http://bit.ly/calledtohealabrokenworld

 

Weekend Schedule:

Agenda

Friday, August 9

11:45 a.m. Official welcome/prayer

12 p.m. Lunch

12:45 – 1:45 p.m. Keynote Address by the Rev. Becca Stevens— “Called to Heal a Broken World”

2:00 – 3:25 p.m. Small group learning choices

3:25 – 3:35 p.m. Break

3:35 – 4:55 p.m.  Small group learning choices

4:55 p.m. meet in the McDevitt Room for prayer

5:00 p.m. Dinner

6:00 – 7:30 p.m. Small group learning choices

7:30 p.m. Deacon led session, the Rev. Michael Nailor, Deacon and the Venerable Jane Miron, Archdeacon, “Deacons in the Liturgy and in the World.”

8:35 p.m. Resources from TEC, free time and informal conversation with workshop leaders

 

Saturday, August 10

8:30 a.m. Breakfast

9:00 – 9:30 a.m. Bible Study led by The Rev. Becca Stevens, Acts 10:1–16

9:30 to 11:00 a.m.   Small Group Learning sessions

11:15 a.m. Commitment to Social Justice; (St. John Chrysostom) – The Rev. Linda Watkins

  • Inspiration for formation for the Beloved Community
  • Social Justice Mentors
  • Network of speakers for your congregation

Noon: Prayers and Lunch

12:45 – 1:00 p.m. Keynote Speaker: The Rev. Becca Stevens “Moving from Commitment to Action”

1:10 p.m. “An Invitation”: Each participant is invited into a small group gathering for next steps for social justice ministries in their contexts. Go to the places you have interest and passion for:

  • Opioid Epidemic
  • Addiction and Recovery
  • Asset Mapping
  • Gun Violence
  • Intro to eradicating racism
  • Resources for Social Justice

2:00 p.m. Closing Eucharist

Go in Peace to Love and Serve the Lord


Healing a Broken World Small Group Learning Sessions

Friday, August 9
2:00 – 3:30 pm- Small Group Learning Sessions

Workshop 1: Roadblocks in Dismantling Racism in our Churches and in Society


Presenter: Kevin Barron

Workshop Description:

Antiracism is an integral part of our formation as followers of Jesus Christ.  As those called as clergy and lay leaders to form disciples of Jesus Christ, our work of formation of our congregations and parishioners is diminished if we do not address the sin of racism as anti-racist.  Yet, it is not enough to be antiracist. One must work to eradicate racism in order to truly address this sin.  Yet, we face personal and institutional roadblocks to actively work to dismantle racism. Therefore, the church remains complicit in continuing systemic and institutional racism.  This workshop will examine some of the ways that the church remains complicit in racism and the roadblocks that stand in the way of dismantling racism within the church.

Kevin Barron

Kevin is a member of the strategy team for the Antiracism Taskforce and co-instructor of the Becoming the Beloved Community course in anti-racism, and a member of the Disciplinary Board.  At St. Luke’s in Altoona he serves as Lay Pastor providing worship, teaching, and pastoral care. At St. Andrew’s in State College, Kevin serves as a lay Eucharistic minister, choir member, and as an officiant for Evening Prayer.  Kevin previously served as Senior Warden, youth leader, and as a member of the rector’s search committee.  He was also a member of the Commission on Ministry.

Kevin holds a master’s degree in Counseling Psychology from Slippery Rock University and has completed all doctoral coursework in Penn State’s Higher Education program.  He is also an EfM graduate.

A resident of State College, he has a career amassing over 30 years at Penn State in a variety of roles. He has served on various diversity and inclusion committees as well as an appointed member of the President’s Commission on LGBTQ Equality. His current role is a director of Volunteer Services for the Penn State Alumni Association. In this capacity, he leads a team that oversees the training and education of over 1000 alumni volunteers.

Workshop 2: Responding to the Opioid Crisis: A Journey Out of Substance Harm

Presenter: The Rev. Canon Kate Harrigan

Workshop Description:

The opioid crisis has become a significant social justice issue in our society, affecting all stratas of our communities. Responding to it becomes a journey out of substance harm. This is a crisis that involves all of us in our society. This workshop begins with a story, and then we will look at what is meant by “substance harm” and who is affected. We will also explore avenues to respond to the crisis as individuals, as a church, and as a society, including what the Episcopal Church is doing, what our communities are doing, and how we can effectively respond as we take a journey out of substance harm.

The Rev. Canon Kate Harrigan

The Rev. Canon Kate Harrigan is the rector of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Harrisburg and chaplain at St. Stephen’s Episcopal School in Harrisburg, and she has been associated with the Stevenson School for many years, teaching discernment, gifts discovery, and courses on ministry in smaller churches. Currently, she is a member of the Social Justice Network for the Diocese of Central PA. She is a Senior Deputy to General Convention and has been appointed to the Episcopal Church’s Task Force on Responding to the Opioid Epidemic.

Workshop 3: Asset Mapping 

Presenter: The Rev. Michael Nailor, Deacon

Workshop Description:

The hard work of building up relationships relies on the effective sharing of information.  Asset mapping is a strategy for sharing information on the strengths of each of our parishes.  It is an outgrowth of a 1990’s model of community developed called Asset Based Community Development.  This workshop will explore strategies for gathering and sharing information on social justice/community outreach ministries.  Sharing in this positive method will benefit individuals, parishes, and the diocese at large.

The Rev. Michael Nailor, Deacon

Michael was born and raised in Mechanicsburg, PA as a member of First Evangelical United Brethren (United Methodist) Church where he was active throughout childhood and as a young adult. He came to the Episcopal Church when he was studying at the University of Pennsylvania. The pioneering women of the “Philadelphia Eleven” had just been irregularly ordained and the church was struggling with the role of women in leadership.

Michael was drawn to a church that was willing to deal with – sometimes successfully, sometimes not – the important social justice issues of the day. Agreeing to disagree but still staying in communion around the Holy Table appealed to this English teacher, debate coach, and school librarian throughout his 41-year career in public education. At Shikellamy High School, the Central Susquehanna Intermediate Unit, Danville High School and Susquehanna University he found students who were eager to think about social issues and incorporate them into teaching and learning.

Through a discernment process at St. Matthew’s Church in Sunbury and with the Diocese of Central Pennsylvania, Michael heard God calling him to the diaconate. Teachers and mentors at the Stevenson School for Ministry, Temple University’s Fox School of Business, the Lutheran Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, and Jefferson Hospital contributed to his mission to encourage the church to consider the ways that it communicates God’s message of loving-kindness to all.

A fieldwork placement at the Philadelphia Episcopal Cathedral provided him not only a spiritual home for the last few years but a testing ground for many ideas about our church, its mission, and its communications. Michael is currently serving Bishop Audrey Scanlan on assignment to St. Stephen’s Cathedral in Harrisburg and the Philadelphia Episcopal Cathedral. He currently serves on the Standing Committee and the Anti-Racism Task Force of our diocese and the Board of the Stevenson School for Ministry.

Friday, August 9
3:35 – 4:50 pm – Environmental Justice Small Group Learning Sessions

Workshop 1: Addiction/Recovery

Presenter: The Rev. Canon Jay Geisler, Mr. Gus DiRenna, and The Rev. Regis Smoker, recovery chaplain

Allegheny Recovery Krew:
Gus DiRenna, leads crews, all in recovery, in renovating what will be a “Serenity House” in one of Pittsburgh’s most opioid-plagued neighborhoods. Mr. DiRenna runs three Serenity Houses, with 19 tenants, each paying around $450 a month. He expects them to work — for someone else, or for him — and to participate in recovery groups.

Canon Jay is one of the region’s foremost experts in addiction and recovery. He co-founded the Oasis Recovery Center to help those seeking recovery from drugs and alcohol. In 2017, he opened a “Serenity House” for women in need of housing within a recovery environment. Recently, he purchased a home, formerly used as a “shooting gallery,” in the struggling neighborhood of Carrick. With help from the Allegheny Recovery Krew (ARK), the home will be renovated and used to provide job training and housing for people in recovery.

Workshop 2: Justice/Self-Care

Presenter: The Rev. Becca Stevens

Becca Stevens is an author, speaker, Episcopal priest, justice entrepreneur, and founder and president of Thistle Farms (Nashville, TN), a community of women survivors of prostitution, trafficking, and addiction. Thistle Farms includes a holistic two—year residential program, justice enterprises that employ survivors, and an education and outreach program that includes a national network of 50 sister communities. The Global Market of Thistle Farms helps employ more than 1,800 women worldwide.

Becca is a graduate of the University of the South and Vanderbilt Divinity School. She has been conferred three honorary doctorates and named a 2011 White House “Champion of Change” as well as a 2016 CNN Top Ten Hero. Becca has been honored as Humanitarian of the Year by the Small Business Council of America as well as the TJ Martell Foundation and has been inducted into the Tennessee Women’s Hall of Fame. She has been featured in The New York Times, ABC World News, NPR, CNN, and other national press.

Becca experienced the death of her father and subsequent child abuse at a young age, and as an adult, she longed to create a sanctuary for survivors. In 1997, five women who had experienced trafficking, violence, and addiction were the first to enter the Magdalene residential program (now one of several Thistle Farms programs). Twenty years later, women continue to heal as they are provided with two years of free housing, medical care, therapy, and education. Residents and graduates earn income through one of four justice enterprises. Thistle Farms’ expanding line of home and body products generates millions of dollars in revenue for survivors around the globe.

Becca is the author of ten books, including her latest: Love Heals (Thomas Nelson, 2017).
Becca regularly keynotes at national events, business gatherings, worship services as well as universities and colleges across the country. She is an international voice for the growing global movement for women’s freedom and a fervently hopeful and loving champion of the marginalized. Becca Stevens and her husband, Grammy-winning songwriter Marcus Hummon, live in Nashville with their three sons.

Workshop 3: Episcopal Peace Fellowship

Presenter: Shannon Mikolajczyk Berndt, Member Services Coordinator

The Episcopal Peace Fellowship (EPF) is a national organization connecting all who seek a deliberate response to injustice and violence and want to pray, study and act for justice and peace in our communities, our church, and the world. We are called to do justice, dismantle violence, and strive to be peacemakers. Become a peacemaker.

Shannon has been on staff since 2012 and a member since 2006. She feels so blessed to work with the wonderful folks that support the Episcopal Peace Fellowship. This has been a wonderful opportunity for me to learn and grow and to continue my activism.

After living in Ithaca, NY, for 18 years, She now resides in the mountains of central Pennsylvania with her husband, and son and attends St. Luke’s Altoona PA. Shannon says, “As a result, EPF has moved with me. “

6:00 to 7:30 pm (Repeat of 3:35- 4:55 pm) Small Group Learning Sessions

8:30 pm – Whole group opportunity
Resources available from TEC —Chuck Wynder


Saturday, August 10

9:30 – 11:00 am Small Group Learning Sessions

 

Workshop 1: POWER/Community Organizing

Presenter: Nathan Sooy & the Rev. Yvette Davis

POWER Interfaith is over 100 congregations of all faiths and races and builds assertive and successful power organizations to challenge racial and economic injustice.

Nathan Sooy has decades of experience in the techniques involved in getting the attention of political and economic power players. Of course, being right is not enough. Sooy thinks that winning on issues requires attention to the dynamics of political power even more than the technical details and research concerning the issues we confront in communities.

Nathan Sooy is Lead Organizer for POWER Interfaith in Central Pennsylvania and is the chief adviser to POWER’s statewide campaign against Education Apartheid and for 100% Fair Funding of Education in PA thru the Fair Funding Formula. Nathan Sooy has been a political and community organizer since 1977 and has led campaigns for social justice in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Ohio.

Nathan Sooy is a former Vestry member at St Luke’s Episcopal Church in Mechanicsburg where he continues to worship.

 

Pastor Yvette Davis is Associate Pastor of Urban Engagement with Cookman Beloved Communities Baptist Church in Philadelphia, PA, The Rev. Dr. Donna Jones, Senior Pastor.

Prior to that, Pastor Davis served in the United Methodist Church in pastoral and extension ministry roles.  Among these roles, she was the first African-American woman pastor of Grace United Methodist Church in Harrisburg, PA and Asbury United Methodist Church in York, PA, and Bridesburg United Methodist Church in Philadelphia, PA.

She served as the Director of The Office of Urban and Global Ministries, Strengthening the Black Church for the 21stCentury Coordinator, and Shalom Coordinator for The Eastern Pennsylvania Conference of The United Methodist Church.  Pastor Davis resourced more than 120 urban local United Methodist churches in the areas of ministering with ethnically and socioeconomically diverse populations in an urban context.

Workshop 2: Dismantling Racism in our Churches and in Society

Presenter: Dr. Marion Schwartz

Antiracism is an integral part of our formation as followers of Jesus Christ.  As those called as clergy and lay leaders to form disciples of Jesus Christ, our work of formation of our congregations and parishioners is diminished if we do not address the sin of racism as antiracist.  Yet, it is not enough to be antiracist. One must work to eradicate racism in order to truly address this sin.  Yet, we face personal and institutional roadblocks to actively work to dismantle racism. Therefore, the church remains complicit in continuing systemic and institutional racism.  This workshop will examine some of the ways that the church remains complicit in racism and the roadblocks that stand in the way of dismantling racism within the church.

Workshop 3: Child Advocacy/Autism

Presenter: Matthew Klipp

My name is Matthew Klipp. I’m autistic, and I am an autism advocate. I just graduated from Gettysburg High School, and I’m a lifelong member of St. Mary’s, Waynesboro. My workshop and movement (G.E.A.R.) are dedicated to spreading autism advocacy and acceptance.

Workshop 4: Everyday Justice

Presenter: The Rev. Dr. Amy Doyle Welin

The distinction between worship of Jesus Christ and acting for social justice is a false dichotomy. As we articulate in the Baptismal Covenant, all those who follow Jesus are invited to work for justice and peace in the world.

What does it look like to embrace social justice, as an individual or as a spiritual leader?

How does one advocate for social justice in communities where people are not comfortable with its political implications?

After 13 years in the Episcopal Church in Connecticut, the Very Rev. Dr. Amy Doyle Welin serves as the Dean of St. Stephen’s Episcopal Cathedral. Her favorite sort of church work involves building connections between people and God. She is an advocate for the incorporation of the work of justice into the daily life of faith communities. Prior to her priestly ordination, Rev. Welin worked as an instructor of medieval and world history, a mediator of insurance claims, and a pastoral associate in a large mid-western church. Rev. Welin is married to the Rev. Dr. Gregory Welin, who is the Priest in Charge at Mt. Calvary in Camp Hill. She is the mother of four young adults and one slightly neurotic cat and likes to garden and practice yoga in her free time.

Workshop 5: Heeding God’s Call – Gun Violence

Presenter:

Information to follow

Resources for: Children | Youth | Young Adults